Rug's Board Game Reviews!

Forum for general chit-chat and discussion.
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Rug
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Re: Rug's Board Game Reviews!

Post by Rug »

The ramakins are 40p in asda (thank me later)

It is certainly not for the faint hearted but if you look up at Agricola I just taught that to an 8 year old so I think the right teacher (i.e. playing to sell the game not to win) will get even new people into things. I wouldn't recoommend it to a newbie but it certainly isn't impossible.

I use the cardboard versions of the cubes to denote 5 of it's respective cube.
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happywondering
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Re: Rug's Board Game Reviews!

Post by happywondering »

I have two questions:

Can I play? I want tooooooooooooooooooooooooo, anachrony looks amazing.

Can you paint the exo-suits models?
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Rug
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Re: Rug's Board Game Reviews!

Post by Rug »

You can definitely play, I plan to paint the models yeah! There is some artwork in the rulebook and stuff which has the colours.
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Rug
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Re: Rug's Board Game Reviews!

Post by Rug »

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Game: Kanagawa
Designer: Bruno Cathala, Charles Chevallier
Price: £15-25
Publisher: IELLO

First thoughts:


On the surface, Kanagawa is a very pretty game and since thematically you play as an up-and-coming artist this makes a lot of sense but don't think there isn't more to it than aesthetics. Bruno Cathala is a clever designer and this game is no exception. The game thrives on two clever mechanics. One is an interesting card drafting mechanic and the other is the dual-purpose cards and how they operate.

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Gameplay:

In Kanagawa you are a student studying under the great Master Hokusai (the man behind the famous painting: The Great Wave of Kanagawa).

Kanagawa consists of the school board, lesson cards, Diploma tiles, player studio tiles, a Master and Assistant pawn and paint pots.

Each round lesson cards are placed on the highest row of the school board face up on plain spaces and face down on red tiles equal to the number of players.

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Example of a two-player set up for round 1

Starting with the first player, players can then choose to 'broaden their knowledge' by passing their turn.
or
putting the masters' teachings into practice. A player chooses a column and puts the cards from that column into their play area.

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New lessons will then be played to the school board and players will be given the same option again this process will happen one more time and at this point players must put the masters' lessons into practice.

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When a player puts their teachings into practice they place lesson cards into their studio in one of two ways:

1. A player can improve their studio by turning the card and placing it in the bottom row of their studio expanding it to provide more options for a player to use for painting.

2. A player can expand their print by looking at the cost on the bottom of a lesson card, placing or moving one of their paint pots in the correct spot in their studio and playing the lesson card to the top row.

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An example of a players studio at the end of their turn

When a player has put his lesson cards into practice he must check if he meets the requirements on any of the diploma tiles. If he meets the requirements on a diploma tile he may take the tile gaining the points and any bonuses on the tile, however, they may choose to forgo that tile choosing to aim for a better tile. If a player chooses to do this they can never go back and regain that tile.

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These are the diplomas. Their requirement is at the bottom and the rewards are above.

This continues until all lesson cards have been played or until one or more players have 11 or more cards in their print. At this point, players score honour (VP's) for:
Each lesson card in their print
The longest sequence of matching seasons in their print
Honour symbols visible in their studio
Honour value of their diploma tiles
and 2 points for the player with the attention of the master

My Conclusion:

This game is great! Thematically it's on point and the mechanisms do a great job of selling the theme. Rounds are quick and the game is light enough to be played with almost anyone no matter the level of the player. There is an element of "push your luck" that comes with when you choose to take your lessons and if you choose to pass up on a diploma in the hopes for a higher level card. There are a few extra rules I haven't included here that add to the decision making but the rule book is short and clear. The cards are dual-purpose and I love how they function.

A final shout out to the illustrator Jade Mosch whose done a great job with the imagery and below "The Great Wave of Kanagawa"

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Frisk
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Re: Rug's Board Game Reviews!

Post by Frisk »

I'm just posting to say that I love this thread.
Have courage and be kind to yourself
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Spork.
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Re: Rug's Board Game Reviews!

Post by Spork. »

They all seem really complex to my brain but I guess that's just not understanding the mechanics and needing practice. I guess video game controls are kind of the same, once you have them down and know what you're doing it's much easier.
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Rug
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Re: Rug's Board Game Reviews!

Post by Rug »

It's worse with text. A visual explanation makes them ten times easier. The last one for example is very simple but the text sounds really complex.

As for the other two they are very complex but definitely doable and definitely worth it!
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Rug
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Re: Rug's Board Game Reviews!

Post by Rug »

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Game: Jaipur
Designer: Sebastien Pauchon
Price: £10-15
Publisher: Gameworks SaRL

First thoughts:


Jaipur is a nifty little title. It is a small box, a short rule book and doesn't break the bank. Whilst gameplay is very simple; outwitting your opponent is as infinitely deep as the players' skill and experience of the game. Timing your moves is critical and where the magic lies in Jaipur.

Gameplay:

Players take on the role of a merchant attempting to collect and exchange goods in order to gain the favour of the Maharaja.

The goods, in descending value, are diamonds, gold and silver. Then cloth, spice, leather and finally Camels.

Set up is simple and will look something like this:

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Note: There will always be 3 camels available in the market after set up plus 2 random goods from the top of the deck

Turns are simple you may take cards or sell cards.

Taking cards:

You may take any number of goods cards from the market but you must replace them with an equal number of goods or camel cards from your own supply.
or
you may take one card from the top of the deck and put it in your hand
or
you may take ALL available camels and place them in your player area.

Note: You may only have 7 cards maximum in your hand at the end of your turn (camels do NOT count towards this number)

Selling Cards:

Take a matching set of goods cards from your hand and place them in a discard pile beside the deck
then
take a number of tokens matching the colour of the set you have discarded equal to the number of cards discarded.

If you have discarded 3 or more cards the Maharaja rewards such an impressive sale by giving you a bonus.

The player takes a token equal to the number of cards he discarded 3 for 3, 4 for 4 or 5 for 5+ 5 being the highest rewards available in the game.

Game End:

When 3 piles of goods tokens have been depleted the game ends immediately.

Players flip all available tokens and gain money as shown. The player with the most camels gets 5 bonus coins.

Whoever has the highest amount wins a Maharaja Favour token. You play again until a player has 2 Maharaja tokens and are declared the winner!

My Conclusion:

One thing I didn't mention above is that the goods token piles all have different values shown here:

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What this means is that players have this wonderful risk/reward feeling where they want to sell early in order to grab the most valuable tokens but are torn because they want to get the larger bonus tiles for a bigger set and also knowing if they wait that long... the other player may sell a set of the same colour and take the highest value cards in that set!!! Oof, so tense!!!

Unlike my all my other reviews Jaipur is a 2 player only game and although some will see this as a con I personally couldn't be happier that Jaipur didn't try to change itself for more sales. Sebastien Pauchon knows exactly how good the game is and didn't compromise it.

Another thought is that for some the theme might not be exciting enough but to that, I will say this: the gameplay far outweighs ANY concern in that department and actually once played makes the theme very satisfying. My proof of this is that before I bought this game I asked a friend to borrow it as I wanted to show it to my 7-year-old (at the time) daughter and thought the theme would ruin it. Well, the joke was on me because this is now my daughters favourite game in my collection to date and I couldn't be happier. In fact, she absolutely savaged me at it just last week... So proud.

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ultimation
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Re: Rug's Board Game Reviews!

Post by ultimation »

I remember playing Kanagawa with Rug in a pub. it was excellent.
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Muir
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Re: Rug's Board Game Reviews!

Post by Muir »

I don't play the games but I really love the pictures, it all looks so pretty
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